Event-based goals: which page a user converted on

Let’s look at the common scenario where you track goals with events. This could be a contact form submission, newsletter subscription, phone number click or other type of interaction where you don’t have a distinct URL to use for destination URL in GA goals settings. You can have the form / link on multiple pages on your site and you want to understand which page a visitor was on when they completed the conversion.

Our example is a hotel booking website where we have a Live Chat button on every page. A simple way to check you conversion numbers is to compare them with the unique events for the same event category and/or action / label. Let’s go to Conversions – Goals – Overview and see how many conversions we have for the Live chat click goal:

goal completions

Now, we’ll check Behavior – Events – Top Events and filter for the same event dimensions we’re using in the goal settings:

event category

So far, great – they match. At this point, simply select Page as secondary dimension and sort by Unique Events column:

event pages

This is the list we want – almost 40% of the users who clicked the Live Chat button were on the home page, and another 30% were on contact-us and rooms pages. You can export the list and group the pages or analyze further.

5 Google Analytics posts you don’t want to miss in July

Here’s again the last post of the month saved for the top 5 interesting Google Analytics related resources I found on other sites. Here are the five for July – you may want to bookmark those as they can be very useful:

Vimeo Tracking with Google Tag Manager

If you want to track how users are interacting with your embedded Vimeo videos, here is a step by step guide to setting up Vimeo tracking using Google Tag Manager (GTM) from Cardinal Path.

Using the Google Analytics Site Search reports

This Loves Data post shows you how to configure your Site Search reports in Google Analytics, explains the Search Terms, Pages and Usage reports, how to understand the post-search navigation and identify post-search issues.

9 Ways to Ensure Ad Tags Work in Google Tag Manager

Implementing tags in GTM from different platforms can be tricky especially if they are custom and require values that are not readily available. LunaMetrics shows 9 ways to ensure they work.

Visualize Any Data With Free Google Data Studio

A very nice walk-through Google’s new Data Studio product: what to use it for, dynamic updates through its live connection with Google products, great sharing and visualizing capabilities.

The Google Analytics Audit Checklist

Use this Google Analytics audit checklist based on Google Sheets from Distilled to make sure your setup provides accurate measurement and your GA account is free of spam or internal sessions, has proper goal tracking and accurate ecommerce tracking.

P.S. Got a Google Analytics question? Send it to me and I’ll try to answer it on the blog.

5 Google Analytics posts you don’t want to miss in June

Here’s again the last post of the month saved for the top 5 interesting Google Analytics related resources I found on other sites. Here are the five for June – you may want to bookmark those as they can be very useful:

How-to Match Your Google Analytics Transactions With Reality

Usually ecommerce clients ask me why the sales numbers in GA don’t match their shopping cart systems. In this article you’ll learn the acceptable level of difference, what the reasons may be and some workarounds when your shopping cart doesn’t allow tracking.

AdWords Call Conversion Tracking with Google Tag Manager

This post shows you how to use Google Forwarding Numbers and GTM to measure calls from your website (not your ad extensions) as success metrics in the evaluation of your Google AdWords account. You will be able to see which campaigns, ad groups, and keywords produce the greatest call volume and optimize accordingly.

Android Google Search App Traffic Appears as Referral Source in Google Analytics

For a month or so you’ll see a new referral source in GA reports called “com.google.android.googlequicksearchbox”. It’s actually organic search traffic from the google android app. Updates were released on 6/9/16 and now referrals from this source are shown as Direct traffic.

Measure Google Tag Manager Event Duration

In this post Simo shows how to measure how much time it takes for GTM events to resolve. He uses User Timings to measure all sorts of important milestones, such as just how long it takes for a font or jQuery library to download.

Using Google Tag Manager to Dynamically Generate Schema/JSON-LD Tags

Here you’ll learn how to use Google Tag Manager to insert JSON-LD into a page, allowing you to add Schema markup to your site without having to touch the site’s code directly. The example is for blogs, but a similar approach can be used for other types of sites too.

P.S. Got a Google Analytics question? Send it to me and I’ll try to answer it on the blog.

At what time do people enter my site

Google Analytics shows you quite a lot of things about your traffic in its standard reports – what sources and locations visitors are coming from, what pages they land on, how long they stay, do they convert, etc. But there’s no standard report to show the time people are entering the website. You can only see a graph by hour in the Audence Overview report if you select the Hourly tab and a shorter time range to avoid sampling.

hourly-sessions

There are Hour and Minute dimensions in GA that we can use to apply to any report. Let’s see at what hour most people are coming to our site by traffic channels: go to Acquisition -> All Traffic -> Channels report and apply secondary dimension hour.

hour-secondary-dimension

In a similar way we can select the Minutes dimension. However, it doesn’t make much sense to use just minutes without the hours, and standard reports in GA can have up to 2 dimensions, so let’s build a custom report. We’ll have 3 dimensions and 2 metrics to keep it simple:

custom-report

Now you can see the specific time of day when people entered your site – an easy way to discover how your links shared on social media or press release announcements are affecting traffic.

5 Google Analytics posts you don’t want to miss in May

Here’s again the last post of the month saved for the top 5 interesting Google Analytics related resources I found on other sites. Here are the five for May – you may want to bookmark those as they can be very useful:

Ad Block Tracking With Google Analytics: Code, Metrics, Reports

Here Avinash explains what’s an ad block and offers a tracking code change through Google Tag Manager or directly together with setting the custom dimensions and segments in Google Analytics. The last part shows 5 reports and KPIs that deliver critical insights from ad blocking behavior. If you’re concerned about your customers using ad blockers, this is the way to understand its impact.

Seer’S Google Analytics heatmap to find your website’s peak times [Download]

Inspired by the heatmap feature in the redesigned GA Mobile App, the Analytics Team at Seer built a Google sheet that you can save in your account which allows you to heatmap certain metrics to identify growing or hot trends over time. It’s really cool, so check it out with your data!

#GTMTips: Using document.write Safely In GTM Tags

Simo’s blog is again featured 2 times this month. This first one is a guest post by Dan Wilkerson from LunaMetrics about the document.write() method used in the Google Tag Manager Custom HTML tags. It explains the problems with having document.write in your 3rd party marketing tags and the proper way to run them in GTM.

Simple Tracker Duplication For Universal Analytics

If you need to easily implement a roll-up GA property with exact hit duplication, this plugin that Simo developed can help. The implementation is straightforward and is recommended to use it with on-page Universal Analytics tracking, not with Google Tag Manager.

Announcing Data Studio: our free, new, Data Visualization Product

Google announced a free version of Data Studio for individuals and smaller teams and you can access it at http://google.com/analytics/data-studio There are a couple of videos about it in the GA Youtube channel and it looks great! You can connect all your marketing data (GA, AdWords, Google Sheets, BigQuery and soon SQL databases to access first party data) and turn that data into beautiful, informative reports that are easy to understand, share (like Google Docs), and fully customizable.

P.S. Got a Google Analytics question? Send it to me and I’ll try to answer it on the blog.